About the Parish

glandford_shellmuseumGlandford is a working village and most of the houses are owned by a Housing association and leased to local people with children of school age or younger. Only one house is available for holiday letting. The main occupations are farming, tourism and some light industry in the old farm buildings (including a busy shop called Cley Spy which sells optical equipment and other items to birdwatchers). The Shell Museum was built by Sir Alfred Jodrell to house his collection of shells at the time that he rebuilt the village. The Museum is closely connected with the Church as the Curator, who lives in Church House adjacent, is also Sacristan/Verger. The Museum is a popular tourist attraction, as is the nearby ford of the River Glaven.

The Parish Church

The Church, which sits on a bluff overlooking the river, was in ruins by the year 1730. There was some limited restoration work in 1875, but it was not until the end of the nineteenth century that Sir Alfred Jodrell, who had inherited Bayfield Hall, decided to rebuild the church in its entirety as a memorial to his mother. The interior of the church is beautifully adorned with wonderful carved woodwork, stained glass and candelabra. The clock tower has a carillon of twelve bells.

Church Life

glandford_churchWith only one Eucharist and one Evensong a month, Church life is limited, but members of the congregation attend other Services and activities within the Benefice. Equally the congregation is normally swollen at Services by regular visitors from neighbouring parishes as well as tourists visiting the area. Because of the location of the church and the beauty of the interior it lends itself to being a place of meditation. A Service of Compline is held here on the first three days of Holy week. These are well attended, as is the intimate candlelight Carol Service at Christmas.